Tuesday, 17 July 2018

Sam Hunt Shares How Wife Hannah Deals With His Heartthrob Status (Exclusive)

"From the beginning I never wanted to sell that."

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]] *Manchester is a town in Grant County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 103 at the 2010 census, a decline of 1.0 percent from 104 at the 2000 census.[3] Geography Manchester is located at 36°59'36?N 98°2'12?W (36.993311, -98.036637).[4] It is located just south of the Oklahoma-Kansas border along SH-132 According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2), all of it land. Demographics Historical population Census Pop. %± 1900 158 — 1910 271 71.5% 1920 237 -12.5% 1930 281 18.6% 1940 269 -4.3% 1950 190 -29.4% 1960 162 -14.7% 1970 165 1.9% 1980 146 -11.5% 1990 106 -27.4% 2000 104 -1.9% 2010 103 -1.0% Est. 2014 103 [5] 0.0% U.S. Decennial Census[6] As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 104 people, 47 households, and 29 families residing in the town. The population density was 440.0 people per square mile (167.3/km²). There were 58 housing units at an average density of 245.4 per square mile (93.3/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 99.04% White, and 0.96% from two or more races. There were 47 households out of which 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.4% were married couples living together, 2.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.2% were non-families. 34.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.21 and the average family size was 2.87. In the town the population was spread out with 21.2% under the age of 18, 3.8% from 18 to 24, 30.8% from 25 to 44, 25.0% from 45 to 64, and 19.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 92.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.0 males. The median income for a household in the town was $27,500, and the median income for a family was $36,250. Males had a median income of $21,250 versus $15,500 for females. The per capita income for the town was $12,760. There were 5.6% of families and 6.7% of the population living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 23.1% of those over 64.
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James Harrison Blows 10-Foot Putt with 30-Foot Shot

Missed it by thaaaat much.  Actually, James Harrison missed his easy 10-foot putt by about thaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat much.  The ex-Steelers linebacker took a break from hittin' the weights to hit the…

*Jackson Township, named after Andrew Jackson,[20] is a township in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township population was 54,856.[9] The population increased by 12,040 (+28.1%) from the 42,816 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 9,583 (+28.8%) from the 33,233 counted in the 1990 Census.[21] The 2010 population was the highest recorded in any decennial census. The township is located within the New Jersey Pine Barrens.[22] Jackson is the site of Six Flags Great Adventure, home to the 456-foot (139 m) Kingda Ka, which as of 2014 is the tallest roller coaster in the world.[23] Jackson is also home to Six Flags Hurricane Harbor and Six Flags Wild Safari. Jackson Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 6, 1844, from portions of Dover Township (now Toms River Township), Freehold Township and Upper Freehold Township, while the area was still part of Monmouth County. It became part of the newly created Ocean County on February 15, 1850. Portions of the township were taken to form Plumsted Township on March 11, 1845.[24] Contents 1 Geography 1.1 Climate 2 Demographics 2.1 2010 Census 2.2 2000 Census 3 Economy 4 Government 4.1 Local government 4.2 Public safety departments 4.3 Federal, state and county representation 4.4 Politics 5 Education 6 Transportation 6.1 Roads and highways 6.2 Public transportation 7 Notable people 8 References 9 External links Geography According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 100.624 square miles (260.616 km2), including 99.244 square miles (257.041 km2) of land and 1.380 square miles (3.575 km2) of water (1.37%).[1][2] Jackson is the largest municipality by area in Ocean County.[1] Vista Center (with a 2010 population of 2,095[25]) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located within Jackson Township.[26][27][28] Other unincorporated communities, localities and populated places located completely or partially within the township include Archers Corner, Bennetts Mills, Burksville, Butterfly Bridge, Cassville, Colliers Mills, DeBow Corner, Francis Mills, Grayville, Harmony, Holmansville, Hyson, Jackson Mills, Kapps Corner, Leesville, Legler, Maryland, Midwood, New Prospect, Pleasant Grove, Prospertown, Ridgeway State Forest, Success, The Alligator, Van Hiseville, Webbsville, Whitesbridge and Whitesville.[29][30][31] The township borders Lakewood Township, Manchester Township, Plumsted Township and Toms River Township in Ocean County, and Freehold Township, Howell Township, Millstone Township and Upper Freehold Township, and in Monmouth County.[32] Colliers Mills Wildlife Management Area is a 12,906.63-acre (5,223.13 ha) wildlife management area located within portions of both Jackson Township and Plumsted Township operated by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Fish and Wildlife.[33][34] Several man-made lakes are located within the township, including Success Lake in the Colliers Mills Wildlife Management Area. Climate Jackson has a Warm Humid Continental Climate.[citation needed] [hide]Climate data for Jackson, NJ Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Average high °F (°C) 41 (5) 44 (7) 51 (11) 61 (16) 71 (22) 80 (27) 85 (29) 83 (28) 77 (25) 67 (19) 57 (14) 46 (8) 63.6 (17.6) Average low °F (°C) 22 (-6) 24 (-4) 30 (-1) 39 (4) 49 (9) 59 (15) 64 (18) 62 (17) 55 (13) 43 (6) 35 (2) 27 (-3) 42.4 (5.8) Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.92 (99.6) 3.30 (83.8) 4.79 (121.7) 4.07 (103.4) 3.73 (94.7) 3.80 (96.5) 4.60 (116.8) 4.69 (119.1) 3.79 (96.3) 3.90 (99.1) 4.11 (104.4) 4.51 (114.6) 49.21 (1,250) Source: [35] Demographics Historical population Census Pop. %± 1850 1,333 * — 1860 1,606 20.5% 1870 1,755 9.3% 1880 1,803 2.7% 1890 1,717 -4.8% 1900 1,595 -7.1% 1910 1,325 -16.9% 1920 1,268 -4.3% 1930 1,719 35.6% 1940 2,153 25.2% 1950 3,513 63.2% 1960 5,939 69.1% 1970 18,276 207.7% 1980 25,644 40.3% 1990 33,233 29.6% 2000 42,816 28.8% 2010 54,856 28.1% Est. 2014 56,449 [12][36] 2.9% Population sources: 1850-2000[37] 1850-1920[38] 1850-1870[39] 1850[40] 1870[41] 1880-1890[42] 1890-1910[43] 1910-1930[44] 1900-1990[45] 2000[46][47] 2010[8][9][10][11] * = Lost territory in previous decade.[24] 2010 Census At the 2010 United States Census, there were 54,856 people, 19,417 households, and 15,048 families residing in the township. The population density was 552.7 per square mile (213.4/km2). There were 20,342 housing units at an average density of 205.0 per square mile (79.2/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 88.90% (48,765) White, 4.86% (2,664) Black or African American, 0.10% (57) Native American, 2.95% (1,616) Asian, 0.03% (18) Pacific Islander, 1.27% (696) from other races, and 1.90% (1,040) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 7.83% (4,295) of the population.[9] There were 19,417 households, of which 35.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.8% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.5% were non-families. 18.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.21.[9] In the township, 24.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 23.7% from 25 to 44, 29.4% from 45 to 64, and 14.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.6 years. For every 100 females there were 94.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.4 males.[9] The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $86,327 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,941) and the median family income was $96,171 (+/- $2,734). Males had a median income of $68,985 (+/- $4,126) versus $45,714 (+/- $2,238) for females. The per capita income for the township was $34,521 (+/- $912). About 2.8% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.4% of those under age 18 and 3.5% of those age 65 or over.[48] 2000 Census As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 42,816 people, 14,176 households, and 11,269 families residing in the township. The population density was 427.9 people per square mile (165.2/km²). There were 14,640 housing units at an average density of 146.3 per square mile (56.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 91.26% White, 3.90% African American, 0.13% Native American, 2.06% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.97% from other races, and 1.67% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.78% of the population.[46][47] There were 14,176 households out of which 44.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.7% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.5% were non-families. 16.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.99 and the average family size was 3.38.[46][47] In the township the population was spread out with 29.7% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 34.2% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 9.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.1 males.[46][47] The median income for a household in the township was $65,218, and the median income for a family was $71,045. Males had a median income of $51,276 versus $33,882 for females. The per capita income for the township was $23,981. About 2.5% of families and 3.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.2% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.[46][47] Economy Near Six Flags is Jackson Premium Outlets, a retail outlet center with 70 stores and a gross leasable area of 285,719 square feet (26,544.2 m2).[49][50] It opened in 1997 and was expanded in 1998.[51] Government Local government As of July 1, 2006, Jackson Township adopted the Mayor-Council form of government under the Faulkner Act, and is governed by a Mayor and five-member Township Council elected at-large in nonpartisan elections.[52] Council members serve four-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election in even years. The Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office that comes up for election during the same year that two council seats are up for vote. The Council selects a President and a Vice President from among its members. Until 2006, Jackson Township was governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee, whose members were elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year.[6] As of June 2011, the Township Council passed an ordinance shifting nonpartisan elections from May to November.[53] As of 2015, the Mayor of Jackson Township is Michael "Mike" Reina, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018. Township Council members are Council President Barry Calogero (2016), Council Vice President Scott Martin (2018), Kenneth J. Bressi (2016), Robert A. Nixon (2016) and Ann M. Updegrave (2018).[54][55][56][57][58][59][60] Public safety departments Police Department Jackson Township has its own Police Department which was established in 1946 and which operates out of the Municipal Justice Complex. Chief of Police Matthew D. Kunz.[61] Fire Department Jackson Township has four fire districts and an industrial fire department: Station 54 - Jackson Mills Fire Co./Jackson Fire District No. 4 (Combination Volunteer/Career) Chief Michael Lubertazzi Station 55 - Jackson Township Fire Co. No. 1/Jackson Twp Fire District No. 3 (Combination Volunteer/Career) Chief Timothy Carson[62] Station 56 - Cassville Fire Co./Jackson Fire District No. 2 (Combination Volunteer/Career) Chief John Alchevsky[63] Station 57 - Whitesville Fire Co./Jackson Fire District No. 1 (Combination Volunteer/Career [contract for personnel from Fire District No. 3]) Chief Scott Rauch Station 58 - Six Flags Fire Department Chief Edward Zakar (Career) Fire Bureau Jackson Township has two Fire Bureaus that enforce the NJ Uniform Fire Safety Act: Jackson Bureau of Fire Prevention District 4 Fire Official John Burmiester Jr. Jackson Bureau of Fire Safety Fire Districts 1, 2 and 3 Fire Official Frank McDonnell Emergency Medical Services Currently emergency medical services are provided by a combination of an independent volunteer first aid squad and a private third party contractor.[64] Quality Medical Transport (units 103, 159, 155) covers EMS calls from 5AM-6PM - Manager Sal Murante Jackson Township First Aid Squad (Squad 22) covers EMS calls from 6PM-5AM - Chief Al Couceiro Six Flags Great Adventure EMS (Squad 80) covers EMS calls within the park during park operating hours. Advanced life support E.M.S., (i.e., paramedics or "Mobile Intensive Care Units"), is provided by hospital providers under a statewide system mandated by the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services. Jackson Township is served primarily by MONOC paramedic units.[65] Federal, state and county representation Jackson Township is located in the 4th Congressional District[66] and is part of New Jersey's 12th state legislative district.[10][67][68] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Jackson Township had been in the 30th state legislative district.[69] New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R).[70] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[71] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[72][73] For the 2014-2015 Session, the 12th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Samuel D. Thompson (R, Old Bridge Township) and in the General Assembly by Robert D. Clifton (R, Matawan) and Ronald S. Dancer (R, Plumsted Township).[74] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[75] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[76] Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[77] At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a Deputy Director from among its members. As of 2015, Ocean County's Freeholders (with party affiliation, term-end year, residence and department directorship listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director John C. Bartlett, Jr. (R, term ends December 31, 2015, Pine Beach; Finance, Parks and Recreation),[78] Freeholder Deputy Director Gerry P. Little (R, 2015, Surf City; Human Services),[79] John P. Kelly (R, 2016, Eagleswood Township; Law and Public Safety),[80] James F. Lacey (R, 2016, Brick Township; Transportation)[81] and Joseph H. Vicari (R, 2017, Toms River; Senior Services and County Operations).[82][83][84] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2015, Barnegat Light),[85][86] Sheriff Michael Mastronardy (R, 2016; Toms River)[87] and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2018, Beachwood).[88][89] Politics As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 34,003 registered voters in Jackson Township, of which 7,177 (21.1%) were registered as Democrats, 7,693 (22.6%) were registered as Republicans and 19,108 (56.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 25 voters registered to other parties.[90] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 62.0% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 82.3% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).[90][91] In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 55.5% of the vote (13,752 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 43.3% (10,728 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (279 votes), among the 24,925 ballots cast by the township's 36,446 registered voters (166 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 68.4%.[92][93] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 55.2% of the vote (14,069 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 43.0% (10,951 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (296 votes), among the 25,480 ballots cast by the township's 34,749 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.3%.[94] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 58.7% of the vote (12,451 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 39.9% (8,458 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (185 votes), among the 21,202 ballots cast by the township's 29,329 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 72.3.[95] In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 73.9% of the vote (11,171 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 24.4% (3,693 votes), and other candidates with 1.7% (259 votes), among the 15,356 ballots cast by the township's 36,215 registered voters (233 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 42.4%.[96][97] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 66.8% of the vote (11,564 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 26.7% (4,620 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 4.3% (737 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (194 votes), among the 17,315 ballots cast by the township's 34,318 registered voters, yielding a 50.5% turnout.[98] Education The Jackson School District serves students in Kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's 10 schools had an enrollment of 9,477 students and 677.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 14.00:1.[99] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[100]) are six elementary schools — Crawford-Rodriguez Elementary School[101] (800 students; in grades PreK-5), Elms Elementary School[102] (759; K-5), Lucy N. Holman Elementary School[103] (690; K-5), Howard C. Johnson Elementary School[104] (607; K-5), Sylvia Rosenauer Elementary School[105] (335; K-5) and Switlik Elementary School[106] (871; K-5) — Carl W. Goetz Middle School[107] (1,280) and Christa McAuliffe Middle School[108] (1,027) for grades 6-8, along with Jackson Liberty High School[109] which opened in 2006 (1,346) and Jackson Memorial High School[110] (1,762) for grades 9-12.[111][112] On January 20, 2015, the Jackson Board of Education voted to implement full-day kindergarten.[113] The full-day kindergarten program will begin in September 2015. Transportation Roads and highways As of May 2010, the township had a total of 312.39 miles (502.74 km) of roadways, of which 201.70 miles (324.60 km) were maintained by the municipality, 101.77 miles (163.78 km) by Ocean County and 8.92 miles (14.36 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[114] CR 527, CR 528, CR 547, CR 537, CR 526, and CR 571 pass through the township. CR 539 also passes through the township, but in the southwest corner, for less than half a mile. Interstate 195 is a major artery that travels through the northern section of Jackson (it just so happens that Jackson is the only municipality in Ocean County that hosts any interstate). While the expressway travels into Howell and Millstone Townships, it is also a vital link for Six Flags since it grants access to the Garden State Parkway, Interstate 295 and the New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95). Public transportation New Jersey Transit bus service is provided on the 139 to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, and to Philadelphia on the 317 route. Seasonal service is offered to Great Adventure on routes 308 (from the Port Authority Bus Terminal) and 318 (from Philadelphia).[115] Academy Bus offers service to Port Authority New York and to Wall Street in Lower Manhattan, with a stop at the Brook Plaza on County Road 526.[116] Ocean Ride local service is provided on the Shopper's Loop route.[117] Notable people See also: Category:People from Jackson Township, New Jersey. People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Jackson Township include: ((B) denotes that the person was born there.) Parker Bohn III (born 1963), professional bowler.[118] Melvin Cottrell (1929–2002), former mayor of Jackson Township who served in the New Jersey General Assembly from 1992 until his death.[119] Scotty Cranmer (born 1987), BMX rider.[120] Rich Gaspari (born 1963), former professional bodybuilder and CEO of Gaspari Nutrition.[121] Frank B. Holman (c. 1930-2005), former mayor of Jackson Township and New Jersey Republican State Chairman.[122] Rob Johnson (born 1973), former professional soccer player who played for the MetroStars.[123] Vini Lopez (born 1949), drummer who played with the E Street Band.[124] Gina Lynn (born 1974), pornographic actress.[125] Steve Niles (born 1965), writer of 30 Days of Night.[126] (B) Johnny Petraglia (born 1947), professional bowler.[127] Anthony Ranaudo (born 1989), pitcher who has played for the Boston Red Sox.[128] Anthony Stolarz (born 1994), professional ice hockey goaltender drafted by the Philadelphia Flyers in the 2nd round of the 2012 NHL entry draft who has played for the Lehigh Valley Phantoms in the American Hockey League.[129] Stanley Switlik (1890–1981), parachuting pioneer who donated the land that is the site of Switlik Elementary School.[130] Zakk Wylde (born 1967 as Jeffrey Phillip Wiedlandt), guitarist for Ozzy Osbourne and Black Label Society.[131]
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SVEVA ALVITI in Swimsuit at a Beach in Ischia 07/17/2018

SVEVA ALVITI in Swimsuit at a Beach in Ischia 07/17/2018 *Ashland is a city in and the county seat of Ashland County, Ohio, United States.[8] The population was 20,362 at the 2010 census. It is the center of the Ashland Micropolitan Statistical Area (as defined by the United States Census Bureau in 2003). Ashland is well known in the state for its "welcome sign" that proclaims the city to be "The World Headquarters of Nice People."[9] Ashland was designated a Tree City USA by the National Arbor Day Foundation. Contents 1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census 4 Government 4.1 Transportation 5 Education 6 Notable people 7 References 8 External links History Ashland was laid out by Daniel Carter in 1815. Ashland was originally called Uniontown, but in 1822 the city was compelled to adopt a new name because another city in Ohio was already named Uniontown. The new name of Ashland was selected by supporters of the Kentucky congressman Henry Clay, from Ashland, his estate near Lexington.[10] Later, "Henry Clay High School" was considered as a name for what is now known as Ashland High School. In the mid-1800s, Ashland pioneers traveled to Oregon, naming a settlement after the town. Geography Ashland is located at 40°52'1?N 82°18'55?W (40.867016, -82.315146).[11] According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 11.23 square miles (29.1 km2), of which 11.17 square miles (28.9 km2) (or 99.47%) is land and 0.06 square miles (0.16 km2) (or 0.53%) is water.[12] The city contains 85.6 miles (137.8 km) of streets, one hospital, one fire station, one police station, and five parks. Demographics Historical population Census Pop. %± 1850 1,264 — 1860 1,748 38.3% 1870 2,601 48.8% 1880 3,004 15.5% 1890 3,568 18.8% 1900 4,087 14.5% 1910 6,795 66.3% 1920 9,249 36.1% 1930 11,141 20.5% 1940 12,453 11.8% 1950 14,287 14.7% 1960 17,419 21.9% 1970 19,872 14.1% 1980 20,252 1.9% 1990 20,079 -0.9% 2000 21,249 5.8% 2010 21,780 2.5% Est. 2014 20,218 [13] -7.2% U.S. Decennial Census[14] 2010 census As of the census[5] of 2010, there were 20,362 people, 8,063 households, and 4,813 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,822.9 inhabitants per square mile (703.8/km2). There were 8,914 housing units at an average density of 798.0 per square mile (308.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.8% White, 1.4% African American, 0.1% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.3% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.2% of the population. There were 8,063 households of which 28.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.2% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 40.3% were non-families. 34.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.91. The median age in the city was 36.1 years. 21% of residents were under the age of 18; 15.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.5% were from 25 to 44; 23.1% were from 45 to 64; and 17.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.8% male and 53.2% female. 2000 census As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 21,249 people, 8,327 households, and 5,262 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,051.5 people per square mile (791.9/km²). There were 8,870 housing units at an average density of 856.4/sq mi (330.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.35% White, 1.19% African American, 0.13% Native American, 1.05% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 0.91% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.85% of the population. There were 8,327 households out of which 29.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.3% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.8% were non-families. 31.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.92. In the city the population was spread out with 22.6% under the age of 18, 15.4% from 18 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 87.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.0 males. The median income for a household in the city was $34,250, and the median income for a family was $42,755. Males had a median income of $33,634 versus $21,781 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,760. About 7.9% of families and 10.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.7% of those under age 18 and 9.1% of those age 65 or over. Government The city is governed by a mayor, Glen P. Stewart, and a five-person city council. Transportation The Ashland County Airport is located three nautical miles (3.5 mi, 5.6 km) northeast of Ashland's central business district.[15] Education Ashland Public Library Ashland Public Schools enroll 3,717 students in public primary and secondary schools.[16] The district operates seven public schools, including four elementary schools, one middle school, one high school, and one alternative school. Other than public schools, the city is home to Ashland Christian School, St. Edward Catholic School, a US Dept. of Education Blue Ribbon School of Excellence, and Ashland Montessori School. The city is home to Ashland University and Ashland Theological Seminary. Both were established by the Brethren Church—an Evangelical Protestant church in the Anabaptist tradition which is headquartered in Ashland. Notable people William B. Allison, U.S. Congressman from Iowa[17] Rolla Kent Beattie, botanist[18] Jessica Canseco, ex-wife of former baseball player José Canseco Ernest Cline, American Screenwriter[19] Mary Hannah Fulton, medical missionary in China James P. Latta, U.S. Representative from Nebraska[20] Ronnie Martin, musician Fred Martinelli, Hall of Fame College Football Coach Joseph D. Moody, president of the Southern California Dental Association and president of the Historical Society of Southern California Eric Musselman, NBA coach Thomas F. Olin, Chairman of Archway Cookies, Incorporated. (Named Ashland, Ohio's first "Citizen of the Year" in 1991)[21][22][23] Aaron and Austin Rhodes, twin vloggers who came out as gay on YouTube.[24] Tim Richmond, NASCAR driver, Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the year John Roseboro, Major League Baseball catcher and coach[25] Edmund G. Ross, Governor of the New Mexico Territory Tim Seder, Arena Football League kicker[26] Alfred P. Swineford, Member of the Michigan House of Representatives from 1871 to 1872. Matt Underwood, Cleveland Indians broadcaster[27] Ron Zook, American football player and coach. Tim Cowen, NASCAR truck series driver, 2002 National Champion
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Democrats Are Pushing New Legislation To Prevent ICE From Shackling Pregnant Women

The bill, which will be released Tuesday, comes in response to a BuzzFeed News report on pregnant women who say they were mistreated while in immigration detention


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*Franklin is a city in Venango County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was estimated 6,545 in the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Venango County. Franklin is part of the Oil City, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area. Contents 1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Crime 5 Education 6 Transportation 7 Attractions 8 Notable people 9 Sports 10 In popular culture 11 References 12 External links History The city's namesake is Benjamin Franklin.[1] The Samuel F. Dale House and Franklin Historic District are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Plumer Block was listed from 1978 to 1986.[2] Geography Franklin is located at 41°23'52?N 79°49'53?W (41.3978, -79.8314). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.7 square miles (12 km2), of which 4.6 square miles (12 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (1.70%) is water. Demographics Historical population Census Pop. %± 1810 159 — 1820 252 58.5% 1830 410 62.7% 1840 595 45.1% 1850 936 57.3% 1860 1,303 39.2% 1870 3,908 199.9% 1880 5,010 28.2% 1890 6,221 24.2% 1900 7,317 17.6% 1910 9,767 33.5% 1920 9,970 2.1% 1930 10,254 2.8% 1940 9,948 -3.0% 1950 10,006 0.6% 1960 9,586 -4.2% 1970 8,629 -10.0% 1980 8,146 -5.6% 1990 7,329 -10.0% 2000 7,212 -1.6% 2010 6,545 -9.2% Est. 2014 6,350 [3] -3.0% Sources:[4][5][6] As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 7,212 people, 3,030 households, and 1,824 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,560.2 people per square mile (602.7/km²). There were 3,281 housing units at an average density of 709.8 per square mile (274.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.77% White, 3.12% African American, 0.08% Native American, 0.33% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.31% from other races, and 1.37% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.67% of the population. There were 3,030 households out of which 29.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.5% were married couples living together, 14.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.8% were non-families. 35.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.94. In the city, the population was spread out with 23.8% under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 25.9% from 25 to 44, 23.1% from 45 to 64, and 18.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 86.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.5 males. The median income for a household in the city was $27,063, and the median income for a family was $37,433. Males had a median income of $35,088 versus $22,475 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,414. About 13.6% of families and 17.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.4% of those under age 18 and 14.4% of those age 65 or over. Crime Crime for 2009 (Source: FBI) Population Violent crime Murder and non-negligent man-slaughter Forcible rape Robbery Aggravated assault Property crime Burglary Larceny-theft Motor vehicle theft Arson 6,608 25 0 5 5 15 176 27 144 5 0 Education The Franklin Area School District currently has one high school, one middle school, and four elementary schools located throughout the area with an estimated 2278 students.[1] The Valley Grove School District currently has one high school and one elementary school located in the Franklin area with an estimated 1026 students. It formerly consisted of one high school, one middle school and two elementary schools, but a consolidation and rebuilding project converted the middle school into a single elementary school that reopened in 2007.[7] Saint Patrick Roman Catholic Church operates an elementary school in the city. Transportation Venango Regional Airport Attractions View of the confluence of French Creek (left) with the Allegheny River at Riverfront Park in Franklin Applefest, the largest craft festival in Western Pennsylvania DeBence Antique Music World Franklin Silver Cornet Band, formed in 1856, one of the oldest traditional town bands in the United States. Barrow-Civic Theatre, performing arts venue for community and Franklin Civic Operetta Association, founded 1959. Franklin Public Library, The Franklin Public Library was founded in 1894 and has had several homes, although its current location on Twelfth Street has been its home since 1921. The original structure on Twelfth Street was built in 1849 as a residence and required extensive renovations in 1921 to make it suitable for library use. A children's room was added in 1964 and another wing was added for the adult collection in 1978. Riverfront Park Notable people John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838 – April 26, 1865) Abraham Lincoln's assassin. In 1864 he formed an oil company in Franklin and resided there while performing at the Franklin Opera House. Nate Byham (born June 27, 1988) American football tight end for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Jack Fultz (born August 27, 1948) Winner of the 1976 Boston Marathon. Judge Robert Lamberton (March 20, 1809 – August 7, 1885) Associate Judge of the Courts of Venango County, Pennsylvania and founder of the Lamberton Savings Bank. Rolland Lawrence (born March 24, 1951) American football Cornerback for the Atlanta Falcons. Hildegarde Dolson Lockridge (1908-1981) Author of mysteries and histories, including We Shook the Family Tree. Ted Marchibroda (born March 15, 1931) American football quarterback and head coach in the National Football League. Alexander McDowell (March 4, 1845 – September 30, 1913) Member of the United States House of Representatives. Charles Miller (June 15, 1843 – December 21, 1927) Franklin businessman and commander of the Pennsylvania National Guard Division Jesse L. Reno (April 20, 1823 – September 14, 1862) United States Army Major General. George C. Rickards (August 25, 1860 -- January 15, 1933) Major General in the United States Army and Chief of the National Guard Bureau Sean W. Rowe (born 1975) Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Northwestern Pennsylvania. George R. Snowden (February 12, 1841 – April 21, 1932) Major General in the Pennsylvania National Guard and commander of the Pennsylvania National Guard Division John A. Wiley (September 3, 1843 – December 28, 1909) National Guard Major General who commanded the 28th Infantry Division Howard Zahniser (February 25, 1906 – May 5, 1964) Environmental activist who authored the Wilderness Act. Sports In 1903, the city was the home of the Franklin Athletic Club, one of the earliest professional football teams. That season, the team was unofficially recognized as the "US Football Champions"[8] and later won the 1903 World Series of Football, held that December at Madison Square Garden.[9] The team included several of the era's top players, such as: Herman Kerchoff, Arthur McFarland, Clark Schrontz, Paul Steinberg, Pop Sweet, Eddie Wood, and coach Blondy Wallace.[10] Among other sporting accomplishments, Franklin Area High School has won two state basketball championships. In 2001 and 2006, the boys team, playing in PIAA Class AAA District 10, defeated Allentown Central Catholic out of District 11 and Communications Tech from District 12 (Philadelphia Public League), respectively.[11] In popular culture The city was the setting of an episode of The X-Files entitled "Blood". It appeared in the show's second season and was actually filmed in British Columbia.
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IT: CHAPTER 2 - Pennywise Actor Bill Skarsgard Talks About Terrorising The Sequel's Adult Cast

In a new interview, Bill Skarsgard has talked about returning as the monstrous Pennywise the Clown in It: Chapter 2 and what it'll be like terrorising the adult versions of the Losers' Club. Check it out! *Dover Township is a civil township of Lenawee County in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the township population was 1,787. Contents 1 Communities 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 References 5 External links Communities Cadmus was established in 1887.[3] Dover was the name of a former post office in the township. The office opened with the name Unionville on January 15, 1836, with James Phillips as the first postmaster. The office was closed April 22, 1842, and reopened with the name Dover on November 22, 1842. The office operated until November 29, 1867.[4][5] Geography According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 35.2 square miles (91.1 km²), of which 35.1 square miles (90.9 km²) is land and 0.1 square mile (0.3 km²) (0.28%) is water. Demographics As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 1,787 people, 650 households, and 501 families residing in the township. The population density was 50.9 per square mile (19.7/km²). There were 686 housing units at an average density of 19.6 per square mile (7.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 97.54% White, 0.28% African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.90% from other races, and 0.84% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.58% of the population. There were 650 households out of which 33.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.2% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.8% were non-families. 17.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.12. In the township the population was spread out with 28.3% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 29.3% from 25 to 44, 25.7% from 45 to 64, and 10.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 106.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 104.8 males. The median income for a household in the township was $45,329, and the median income for a family was $51,587. Males had a median income of $37,750 versus $24,148 for females. The per capita income for the township was $18,299. About 8.8% of families and 10.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.1% of those under age 18 and 10.4% of those age 65 or over.
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FUSCHIA SUMNER at McQueen Special Screening in Los Angeles 07/16/2018

FUSCHIA SUMNER at McQueen Special Screening in Los Angeles 07/16/2018 *Ashland is a city in and the county seat of Ashland County, Ohio, United States.[8] The population was 20,362 at the 2010 census. It is the center of the Ashland Micropolitan Statistical Area (as defined by the United States Census Bureau in 2003). Ashland is well known in the state for its "welcome sign" that proclaims the city to be "The World Headquarters of Nice People."[9] Ashland was designated a Tree City USA by the National Arbor Day Foundation. Contents 1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census 4 Government 4.1 Transportation 5 Education 6 Notable people 7 References 8 External links History Ashland was laid out by Daniel Carter in 1815. Ashland was originally called Uniontown, but in 1822 the city was compelled to adopt a new name because another city in Ohio was already named Uniontown. The new name of Ashland was selected by supporters of the Kentucky congressman Henry Clay, from Ashland, his estate near Lexington.[10] Later, "Henry Clay High School" was considered as a name for what is now known as Ashland High School. In the mid-1800s, Ashland pioneers traveled to Oregon, naming a settlement after the town. Geography Ashland is located at 40°52'1?N 82°18'55?W (40.867016, -82.315146).[11] According to the 2010 census, the city has a total area of 11.23 square miles (29.1 km2), of which 11.17 square miles (28.9 km2) (or 99.47%) is land and 0.06 square miles (0.16 km2) (or 0.53%) is water.[12] The city contains 85.6 miles (137.8 km) of streets, one hospital, one fire station, one police station, and five parks. Demographics Historical population Census Pop. %± 1850 1,264 — 1860 1,748 38.3% 1870 2,601 48.8% 1880 3,004 15.5% 1890 3,568 18.8% 1900 4,087 14.5% 1910 6,795 66.3% 1920 9,249 36.1% 1930 11,141 20.5% 1940 12,453 11.8% 1950 14,287 14.7% 1960 17,419 21.9% 1970 19,872 14.1% 1980 20,252 1.9% 1990 20,079 -0.9% 2000 21,249 5.8% 2010 21,780 2.5% Est. 2014 20,218 [13] -7.2% U.S. Decennial Census[14] 2010 census As of the census[5] of 2010, there were 20,362 people, 8,063 households, and 4,813 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,822.9 inhabitants per square mile (703.8/km2). There were 8,914 housing units at an average density of 798.0 per square mile (308.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.8% White, 1.4% African American, 0.1% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.3% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.2% of the population. There were 8,063 households of which 28.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.2% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 40.3% were non-families. 34.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.91. The median age in the city was 36.1 years. 21% of residents were under the age of 18; 15.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.5% were from 25 to 44; 23.1% were from 45 to 64; and 17.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.8% male and 53.2% female. 2000 census As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 21,249 people, 8,327 households, and 5,262 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,051.5 people per square mile (791.9/km²). There were 8,870 housing units at an average density of 856.4/sq mi (330.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.35% White, 1.19% African American, 0.13% Native American, 1.05% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 0.91% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.85% of the population. There were 8,327 households out of which 29.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.3% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.8% were non-families. 31.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.92. In the city the population was spread out with 22.6% under the age of 18, 15.4% from 18 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 87.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.0 males. The median income for a household in the city was $34,250, and the median income for a family was $42,755. Males had a median income of $33,634 versus $21,781 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,760. About 7.9% of families and 10.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.7% of those under age 18 and 9.1% of those age 65 or over. Government The city is governed by a mayor, Glen P. Stewart, and a five-person city council. Transportation The Ashland County Airport is located three nautical miles (3.5 mi, 5.6 km) northeast of Ashland's central business district.[15] Education Ashland Public Library Ashland Public Schools enroll 3,717 students in public primary and secondary schools.[16] The district operates seven public schools, including four elementary schools, one middle school, one high school, and one alternative school. Other than public schools, the city is home to Ashland Christian School, St. Edward Catholic School, a US Dept. of Education Blue Ribbon School of Excellence, and Ashland Montessori School. The city is home to Ashland University and Ashland Theological Seminary. Both were established by the Brethren Church—an Evangelical Protestant church in the Anabaptist tradition which is headquartered in Ashland. Notable people William B. Allison, U.S. Congressman from Iowa[17] Rolla Kent Beattie, botanist[18] Jessica Canseco, ex-wife of former baseball player José Canseco Ernest Cline, American Screenwriter[19] Mary Hannah Fulton, medical missionary in China James P. Latta, U.S. Representative from Nebraska[20] Ronnie Martin, musician Fred Martinelli, Hall of Fame College Football Coach Joseph D. Moody, president of the Southern California Dental Association and president of the Historical Society of Southern California Eric Musselman, NBA coach Thomas F. Olin, Chairman of Archway Cookies, Incorporated. (Named Ashland, Ohio's first "Citizen of the Year" in 1991)[21][22][23] Aaron and Austin Rhodes, twin vloggers who came out as gay on YouTube.[24] Tim Richmond, NASCAR driver, Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the year John Roseboro, Major League Baseball catcher and coach[25] Edmund G. Ross, Governor of the New Mexico Territory Tim Seder, Arena Football League kicker[26] Alfred P. Swineford, Member of the Michigan House of Representatives from 1871 to 1872. Matt Underwood, Cleveland Indians broadcaster[27] Ron Zook, American football player and coach. Tim Cowen, NASCAR truck series driver, 2002 National Champion
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Smutty Social Media, July 17, 2018

Jennifer Garner was on CBS Sunday Morning, which filmed at the family farm she recently acquired to grow produce for her baby food company, Once Upon a Farm. (Her mom grew up on that farm, and her Uncle Robert still lives there.) Then it was coffee with Ina Garten in Ina's barn (a rare treat even fo... *Springfield is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Clark County.[6] The municipality is located in southwestern Ohio and is situated on the Mad River, Buck Creek and Beaver Creek, approximately 45 miles (72 km) west of Columbus and 25 miles (40 km) northeast of Dayton. Springfield is home to Wittenberg University, a liberal arts college. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 60,608.[7] The Springfield Metropolitan Statistical Area had a population of 138,333 residents.[8] and the Dayton-Springfield-Greenville, OH Combined Statistical Area had 1,072,891 residents.[9] The Little Miami Scenic Trail, a paved rail-trail which is almost 80 miles long, goes from the Buck Creek Scenic Trailhead in Springfield south to Newtown, Ohio (near Cincinnati), and is popular with hikers and cyclists. In 1983, Newsweek featured Springfield in its 50th anniversary issue, entitled, "The American Dream." It chronicled the impact of the past 50 years on five local families. In 2004, Springfield was chosen as an "All-America City". In 2010, Springfield ranked third worst in a national wellbeing survey conducted by The Gallup Organization.[10] In 2011, Springfield was named the "unhappiest city in America" by another Gallup survey.[11]In 2015, Springfield was ranked the least healthy city in Ohio by 24/7 Wall St.[12][13] Contents 1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 3.1 2010 census 3.2 Crime 4 Education 5 Media 6 Notable people 7 See also 8 References 9 External links History The villages of Peckuwe and Piqua were located near today's Springfield, Ohio, at 39° 54.5' N, 83° 54.68' W and 39° 54.501' N, 83° 54.682' W respectively, and were home to the Peckuwe and Kispoko Divisions of the Shawnee Tribe until the Battle of Piqua, August 8, 1780. The Piqua Sept of Ohio Shawnee Tribe have placed a traditional cedar pole in commemoration, located "on the southern edge of the George Rogers Clark Historical Park, in the lowlands in front of the park's 'Hertzler House.'"[14][15] Springfield was founded by James Demint, a former teamster from Kentucky, in 1801. When Clark County was created from parts of Champaign, Madison and Greene counties, Springfield, named for Springfield, Massachusetts – which, at the time, was important for hosting the U.S. Federal Springfield Armory; enduring the Attack on Springfield during King Philip's War in 1675,; and Shays' Rebellion in 1787. Springfield traces its early growth to the National Road, which ended in Springfield for approximately 10 years as politicians wrangled over the path it would continue. Dayton and Eaton wanted the road to veer south after Springfield, but President Andrew Jackson made the final decision to have the road continue straight west to Richmond, Indiana.[16] Springfield around 1830 Springfield around 1900 During the mid-and-late 19th century, Springfield was dominated by industrialists including Oliver S. Kelly, Asa S. Bushnell, James Leffel, P. P. Mast and Benjamin H. Warder. Asa S. Bushnell built the Springfield, Ohio Bushnell Building[17] where the patent attorney to the Wright Brothers, Harry Aubrey Toulmin, Sr., wrote the 1904 patent to cover the invention of the airplane. To promote the products of his agricultural equipment company, P. P. Mast started the Farm and Fireside magazine. Mast's publishing company – Mast, Crowell, and Kirkpatrick – grew to become Crowell-Collier Publishing Company best known for Collier's Weekly. In 1894, The Kelly Springfield Tire Company was founded. At the turn of the 20th century Springfield became known as the "Home City." Several lodges including the Masonic Lodge, Knights of Pythias and Odd Fellows built homes for orphans and aged members of their order. Springfield also became known as "The Champion City". a reference to the Champion Farm Equipment brand manufactured by the Warder, Bushnell & Glessner Company, which was later absorbed into International Harvester in 1902. International remains in Springfield as Navistar International, a producer of medium to large trucks. In 1902 A.B. Graham, then the superintendent of schools for Springfield Township in Clark County, established a "Boys' and Girls' Agricultural Club." Approximately 85 children from 10 to 15 years of age attended the first meeting on January 15, 1902 in Springfield, Ohio, in the basement of the Clark County Courthouse. This was the start of what would be called the "4-H Club" within a few years, quickly growing to a nationwide organization. (4-H stands for "Head, Heart, Hands, and Health").[18] The first "projects" included food preservation, gardening and elementary agriculture. Today, the Courthouse still bears a large 4H symbol under the flag pole at the front of the building to commemorate its part in founding the organization. The Clark County Fair is the second largest fair in the state (only the Ohio State Fair is larger) in large part to 4H still remaining very popular in the area. On March 7, 1904, over a thousand residents formed a lynch mob, stormed the jail and removed prisoner Richard Dixon, a black man accused of murdering police officer Charles B. Collis. Richard Dixon was shot to death and then hung from a pole on the corner of Fountain and Main Street, where the mob continued to shoot his lifeless body. The mob then proceeded to burn much of the black area of town.[19] In February 1906, another mob formed and again burned the black section of town known as "the levee".[20] Sixty years later, Springfield was the first city in Ohio to have a black mayor, Robert Henry.[21] Clark County Courthouse in downtown Springfield From 1916 to 1926, 10 automobile companies operated in Springfield. Among them: The Bramwell, Brenning, Foos, Frayer-Miller, Kelly Steam, Russell-Springfield and Westcott. The Westcott, known as the car built to last, was a six-cylinder four-door sedan manufactured by Burton J. Westcott of the Westcott Motor Car Company. Burton and Orpha Westcott however, are better known for having contracted the world-renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright to design their home in 1908 at 1340 East High Street. The Westcott House, a sprawling two-story stucco and concrete house has all the features of Wright's prairie style including horizontal lines, low-pitched roof, and broad eaves. It is the only Frank Lloyd Wright prairie style house in the state of Ohio. The property was purchased in 2000 by the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy (Chicago, IL), and as part of a prearranged plan, the house was then sold to a newly formed local Westcott House Foundation. The Westcott House Foundation managed the extensive 5-year, $5.3 million restoration, the house was fully restored to its original glory in October 2005, when it officially opened to the public for guided tours. Old City Hall, now the Clark County Heritage Center International Harvester (now Navistar), manufacturer of farm machinery and later trucks, became the leading local industry after Springfield native William Whiteley invented the self-raking reaper and mower, in 1856. It held that position, along with Crowell-Collier Publishing, throughout most of the next century. The city is served by one daily newspaper, the Springfield News-Sun, and by one weekly newspaper, The Springfield Paper. Geography Springfield is located at 39°55'37?N 83°48'15?W (39.927067, -83.804131).[22] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 25.50 square miles (66.04 km2), of which, 25.29 square miles (65.50 km2) is land and 0.21 square miles (0.54 km2) is water.[1] The Clarence J. Brown Reservoir is located on the northeast outskirts of Springfield. Demographics Historical population Census Pop. %± 1810 593 — 1820 1,868 215.0% 1830 1,080 -42.2% 1840 2,062 90.9% 1850 5,108 147.7% 1860 7,002 37.1% 1870 12,652 80.7% 1880 20,730 63.8% 1890 31,895 53.9% 1900 38,253 19.9% 1910 46,921 22.7% 1920 60,840 29.7% 1930 68,743 13.0% 1940 70,662 2.8% 1950 78,508 11.1% 1960 82,723 5.4% 1970 81,926 -1.0% 1980 72,563 -11.4% 1990 70,487 -2.9% 2000 65,358 -7.3% 2010 60,608 -7.3% Est. 2014 59,956 [23] -1.1% [4][24][25][26][27] As of the 2000 census,[4] the median income for a household in the city was $32,193, and the median income for a family was $39,890. Males had a median income of $32,027 versus $23,155 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,660. 16.9% of the population and 13.5% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 23.9% of those under the age of 18 and 9.6% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line. 2010 census As of the 2010 census,[7] there were 60,608 people, 24,459 households, and 14,399 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,693.7 people per square mile (1,039.6/km²). There were 28,437 housing units at an average density of 1,263.9 per square mile (487.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 75.2% White, 18.1% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 4.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.0% of the population. There are 24,459 households of which 26.3% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 34.4% are married couples living together, 18.6% have a female householder with no spouse present, 5.9% have a male householder with no spouse present, and 41.1% are non-families. 34.1% of all households are made up of individuals and 13.7% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.38 and the average family size is 3.01. In the population is spread out with 24.4% under the age of 18, 11.5% from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 24.6% from 45 to 64, and 15.3% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 36 years. For every 100 females there are 90.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 86.2 males. Crime From 2012 through 2014, the city experienced a 21% increase in violent crime; from 618 per 100,000 persons to 750. Also during those years, occurrences of murder and non-negligent manslaughter steadily increased; from 5 to 7.[28][29][30] As of December 8, 2015, the number of homicides in Springfield year-to-date was 12.[31] Education Springfield Public Schools enroll 8,604 students in public primary and secondary schools.[32] The district operates 16 public schools including ten elementary schools, three middle schools, one high school, and one alternative school. Springfield is also home to Nightingale Montessori, a small private school using the methods from Dr. Montessori. The school was founded over thirty years ago, and has been educating many from Springfield, Clark County and other surrounding counties such as Greene, Clinton, Champaign, Franklin, Madison and Logan. The school accepts the Ed Choice scholarship, The Jon Peterson Scholarship and the Autism Scholarship. Students are admitted as early as 2 1/2 years old through high school. Wittenberg University Springfield is home to two institutions of higher learning, Wittenberg University and Clark State Community College. Wittenberg University is a Lutheran University that was founded in Springfield in 1845. It is a four-year private liberal arts university. It has more than two thousand students and a faculty of more than one hundred ninety five. It is situated on a campus of one hundred and fourteen rolling acres, shaded by many majestic trees. It is one of the most highly rated liberal arts universities in the nation, offering more than seventy majors, which include those in the sciences as well as in the arts. Wittenberg has more than one hundred fifty campus organizations, which include ten national fraternities and sororities. It has its own WUSO radio station and newspaper. The University is best known for its music department and its athletic endeavors. Wittenberg is also distinguished by its strong interdisciplinary programs such as East Asian Studies and Russian Area Studies. Recently majors in Management, Communication, Education are also becoming popular. The University made major renovations to its science facilities with the opening of the Barbara Deer Kuss Science Center in 2003. The city is also home to Clark State Community College. Clark State Community College was founded in 1962 under the name of the Springfield and Clark County Technical Education Program as a technical education college for Clark County, Ohio and the surrounding area. It changed its name in 1966 to Clark County Technical Institute. The Ohio Board of Regents accredited it as Ohio's first technical college. It is now called Clark State Community College and has more than one thousand students. It offers courses in business, health, public services, engineering technologies, agriculture and general studies. Media In the 1950 film Pagan Love Song, starring Esther Williams, actor Howard Keel played Hap "Hazard" Endicott, a school teacher from Springfield, Ohio.[33] In 2009, during a scene of the movie X-Men Origins: Wolverine, "Springfield, Ohio" is listed in the scene caption as the location of a carnival where Victor Creed/Sabretooth finds Chris Bradley/Bolt working as a game booth attendant. The Springfield News-Sun, The Wittenberg Torch, WEEC-FM radio, WUSO-FM radio are the city's main media organizations. PBS' Market Warriors is scheduled to air an episode on September 17, 2012 featuring the Springfield Antique Show and Flea Market.[34] Notable people The following are notable people born and/or raised in Springfield: Berenice Abbott – photographer Randy Ayers – assistant coach of the New Orleans Pelicans, former head coach of Ohio State and the Philadelphia 76ers Dave Burba – major league baseball player William R. Burnett – novelist and screenwriter Garvin Bushell – musician (saxophone, clarinet, etc.) Justin Chambers – former model and actor (in the cast of Grey's Anatomy) Lewis Strong Clarke – Louisiana sugar planter and Republican politician in the 19th century[35] Call Cobbs, Jr. – jazz pianist Jason Collier – professional basketball player Andrew Daniel – winner of Big Brother 5 Trey DePriest - Linebacker of the Baltimore Ravens, 2 time NCAA National Champion of the Alabama Crimson Tide football team. Mike DeWine – former US Senator for Ohio and present Ohio Attorney General Marsha Dietlein – actress Adam Eaton (outfielder) - Major league baseball player Wayne Embry – professional basketball player Lillian Gish – actress from the silent film era and after Luther Alexander Gotwald Prof., D.D. – tried for and acquitted of Lutheran heresy at Wittenberg College in 1893. Albert Belmont Graham – Founder of 4H Harvey Haddix – major league baseball player Robert C. Henry – first African American mayor of any city Dustin Hermanson – major league baseball player Dave Hobson – Former U.S. Congressman for Ohio's Seventh District Alice Hohlmayer – All-American Girls Professional Baseball League player Griffin House – singer-songwriter Jimmy Journell – major league baseball player J. Warren Keifer – Civil War General and Speaker of the House Bradley Kincaid -America's first country music star. He performed on WLS, WBZ, and WLW. David Ward King – inventor of the King road drag Brooks Lawrence – major league baseball player John Legend (a.k.a. John Stephens) – singer, musician, R&B and neo-soul pianist Lois Lenski – author and illustrator of children's fiction, including Strawberry Girl Deborah Loewer – U.S. Navy flag officer Luke Lucas – major league baseball player Johnny Lytle – jazz musician Will McEnaney – major league baseball player, pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds Jeff Meckstroth – Multiple world champion bridge player Davey Moore – Boxer, World Featherweight Title holder 1959–1963 Troy Perkins – professional soccer player Carl Ferdinand Pfeifer – Presidential aide Coles Phillips – early 20th century illustrator, inventor of the "fade-away" girl Robert Bruce Raup – Professor, Teachers College, Columbia University, writer, and critic of American Education system. Alaina Reed Hall – television actress, "227 (TV series)" and "Sesame Street" Cecil Scott – jazz clarinetist, tenor saxophonist, and bandleader Dick Shatto – professional Canadian football player Winant Sidle – U.S. Army Major General James Garfield Stewart, Supreme Court of Ohio the 109th Justice Dann Stupp – author Charles Thompson – jazz musician Tommy Tucker (a.k.a. Robert Higginbotham) – jazz musician W. D. Twichell – surveyor Christopher J. Waild – screenwriter Earle Warren – jazz saxophonist with Count Basie Walter L. Weaver – U.S. Representative from Ohio Rick White – major league baseball player Worthington Whittredge – Hudson River School painter Jonathan Winters – actor and comedian
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