Saturday, 5 August 2017

Newswire: Blessed are The Handmaid’s Tale, Atlanta, Big Little Lies, and other Television Critics Association Award winners

The Handmaid's Tale took home the top prize at tonight's Television Critics Association Awards, the professional organization's annual celebration of TV excellence. In addition to winning the trophy for Outstanding Achievement in Drama, Hulu's adaptation of Margaret Atwood's dystopian novel was named Program of the Year, a reflection of both the quality of the series and the feeling of creeping unease that comes standard with each new day of 2017. This ushers The Handmaid's Tale into the company of recent winners The People V. O.J. Simpson, Empire, Breaking Bad, and Game Of Thrones, each of which captured the zeitgeist and the TCA's approval at a time when it didn't feel like an authoritarian regime was breathing down their necks. Oh, to think of those carefree days when a relatively optimistic show like The West Wing, From Earth To The Moon, or ...

*Burlington Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States and a suburb of Philadelphia. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 22,594,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 2,300 (+11.3%) from the 20,294 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 7,840 (+63.0%) from the 12,454 counted in the 1990 Census.[18] Burlington was formed as a "Towne" by the West Jersey proprietors, and was interrelated to Burlington City during its early days. Burlington was incorporated on February 21, 1798, by an act of the New Jersey Legislature as one of New Jersey's initial group of 104 townships. Burlington City was reincorporated within the township as of March 14, 1851, at which time a portion of the township was annexed to the city.[19] The township's name is a corruption of the English town of Bridlington.[20][21] Contents 1 Geography 2 Demographics 2.1 Census 2010 2.2 Census 2000 3 Economy 4 Government 4.1 Local government 4.2 Federal, state and county representation 4.3 Politics 5 Education 6 Transportation 6.1 Roads and highways 6.2 Public transportation 7 Notable people 8 References 9 External links Geography According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 13.98 square miles (36.209 km2), including 13.415 square miles (34.745 km2) of land and 0.565 square miles (1.463 km2) of water (4.04%).[2][3] Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Deacons, Fountain Woods, Springside and Stevens.[22] The township borders Burlington City, Edgewater Park Township, Florence Township, Springfield Township and Willingboro Township in Burlington County and both Bristol and Bristol Township across the Delaware River in Pennsylvania.[23] Demographics Historical population Census Pop. %± 1800 2,009 — 1810 2,419 20.4% 1820 2,758 14.0% 1830 2,670 -3.2% 1840 3,434 28.6% 1850 863 * -74.9% 1860 876 1.5% 1870 1,025 17.0% 1880 1,147 11.9% 1890 958 -16.5% 1900 1,061 10.8% 1910 1,220 15.0% 1920 1,520 24.6% 1930 2,587 70.2% 1940 2,520 -2.6% 1950 3,441 36.5% 1960 6,291 82.8% 1970 10,621 68.8% 1980 11,527 8.5% 1990 12,454 8.0% 2000 20,294 63.0% 2010 22,594 11.3% Est. 2014 22,673 [10][24] 0.3% Population sources: 1800-2000[25] 1800-1920[26] 1840[27] 1850[28] 1870[29] 1880-1890[30] 1890-1910[31] 1910-1930[32] 1930-1990[33] 2000[34][35] 2010[7][8][9] * = Lost territory in previous decade[19] Census 2010 At the 2010 United States Census, there were 22,594 people, 7,797 households, and 5,746 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,684.2 per square mile (650.3/km2). There were 8,105 housing units at an average density of 604.2 per square mile (233.3/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 59.00% (13,331) White, 27.98% (6,322) Black or African American, 0.15% (35) Native American, 7.04% (1,590) Asian, 0.04% (9) Pacific Islander, 2.41% (544) from other races, and 3.38% (763) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 7.05% (1,593) of the population.[7] There were 7,797 households, of which 39.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.2% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.3% were non-families. 21.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.32.[7] In the township, 26.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 25.6% from 25 to 44, 28.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.6 years. For every 100 females there were 90.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.1 males.[7] The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $83,291 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,419) and the median family income was $101,967 (+/- $6,626). Males had a median income of $60,587 (+/- $3,161) versus $50,078 (+/- $3,792) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,122 (+/- $1,352). About 3.0% of families and 5.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.2% of those under age 18 and 6.9% of those age 65 or over.[36] Census 2000 As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 20,294 people, 7,112 households, and 5,277 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,506.2 people per square mile (581.7/km²). There were 7,348 housing units at an average density of 545.4 per square mile (210.6/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 67.71% White, 24.49% African American, 0.16% Native American, 3.73% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.46% from other races, and 2.41% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.01% of the population.[34][35] There were 7,112 households out of which 40.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.0% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.8% were non-families. 21.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.18.[34][35] In the township the population was spread out with 27.2% under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 35.4% from 25 to 44, 19.2% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 90.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.1 males.[34][35] The median income for a household in the township was $61,663, and the median income for a family was $70,958. Males had a median income of $49,290 versus $35,510 for females. The per capita income for the township was $24,754. About 3.4% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.7% of those under age 18 and 7.5% of those age 65 or over.[34][35] Economy Burlington Coat Factory has its headquarters in the township,[37] having relocated from Burlington City in 1988.[38] The Marketplace at Burlington, formerly an indoor mall known as the Burlington Center Mall, offers a gross leasable area of 670,000 square feet (62,000 m2), with plans to convert to an open-air format with 1,500,000 square feet (140,000 m2) of leasable space.[39][40] Government Local government Burlington Township is governed within the Faulkner Act, formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law, under the Mayor-Council (Plan E) form of municipal government, implemented based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission as of January 1, 1975.[41] The governing body consists of a mayor and a seven-member Township Council, all of whom are elected at-large in partisan elections to four-year terms in office on a staggered basis as part of the November general election. Either three or four council seats are up for vote every other year in even years, with the mayoral seat up for vote during the same cycle where three council seats are up for vote.[5] As of 2015, the Mayor of Burlington Township is Democrat Brian J. Carlin, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018. Members of the Burlington Township Council are Council President Robert W. Jung (D, 2016), President Pro Tem Patricia "Trish" Siboczy (D, 2016), Michael K. Cantwell (D, 2018), E.L. "Pete" Green (D, 2016), Joyce R. Howell (D, 2018), George M. Kozub (D, 2018) and Carl M. Schoenborn (D, 2016).[42][43][44][45] Federal, state and county representation Burlington Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District[46] and is part of New Jersey's 7th state legislative district.[8][47][48] Prior to the 2010 Census, Burlington Township had been part of the 3rd Congressional District and the 4th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[49] New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Tom MacArthur (R, Toms River).[50] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[51] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[52][53] The 7th district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Diane Allen (R, Edgewater Park Township) and in the General Assembly by Herb Conaway (D, Delanco Township) and Troy Singleton (D, Palmyra).[54] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[55] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[56] Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[57] The board chooses a director and deputy director from among its members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[57] As of 2015, Burlington County's Freeholders are Director Mary Ann O'Brien (R, Medford Township, 2017; Director of Administration and Human Services),[58] Deputy Director Bruce Garganio (R, Florence Township, 2017; Director of Public Works and Health),[59] Aimee Belgard (D, Edgewater Park Township, 2015; Director of Hospital, Medical Services and Education)[60] Joseph Donnelly (R, Cinnaminson Township, 2016; Director of Public Safety, Natural Resources, and Education)[61] and Joanne Schwartz (D, Southampton Township, 2015; Director of Health and Corrections).[62][57] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Tim Tyler,[63] Sheriff Jean E. Stanfield[64] and Surrogate George T. Kotch.[65] Politics As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 13,214 registered voters in Burlington Township, of which 5,382 (40.7% vs. 33.3% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 2,160 (16.3% vs. 23.9%) were registered as Republicans and 5,664 (42.9% vs. 42.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 8 voters registered to other parties.[66] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 58.5% (vs. 61.7% in Burlington County) were registered to vote, including 79.8% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.3% countywide).[66][67] In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 7,345 votes (68.4% vs. 58.1% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 3,229 votes (30.1% vs. 40.2%) and other candidates with 103 votes (1.0% vs. 1.0%), among the 10,744 ballots cast by the township's 14,146 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.0% (vs. 74.5% in Burlington County).[68][69] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 7,266 votes (65.3% vs. 58.4% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 3,692 votes (33.2% vs. 39.9%) and other candidates with 99 votes (0.9% vs. 1.0%), among the 11,127 ballots cast by the township's 13,570 registered voters, for a turnout of 82.0% (vs. 80.0% in Burlington County).[70] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 5,696 votes (57.4% vs. 52.9% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 4,086 votes (41.1% vs. 46.0%) and other candidates with 72 votes (0.7% vs. 0.8%), among the 9,931 ballots cast by the township's 12,351 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.4% (vs. 78.8% in the whole county).[71] In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 3,486 votes (53.1% vs. 61.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 2,874 votes (43.7% vs. 35.8%) and other candidates with 76 votes (1.2% vs. 1.2%), among the 6,570 ballots cast by the township's 14,162 registered voters, yielding a 46.4% turnout (vs. 44.5% in the county).[72][73] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 3,483 ballots cast (52.9% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 2,669 votes (40.6% vs. 47.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 283 votes (4.3% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 90 votes (1.4% vs. 1.2%), among the 6,578 ballots cast by the township's 13,512 registered voters, yielding a 48.7% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[74] Education Public school students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade are educated in the Burlington Township School District, under superintendent Christopher Manno. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's four schools had an enrollment of 4,097 students and 303.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.51:1.[75] The Burlington Township School District (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[76]) are B. Bernice Young Elementary School[77] (899 students in grades pre-K to 2nd grade), Fountain Woods Elementary School[78] (901; 3-5), Burlington Township Middle School at Springside[79] (1,016; 6-8) and Burlington Township High School[80] (1,201; 9-12).[81][82] The Burlington Township School District received publicity in 2009 after a video posted on YouTube by a parent without school approval showed more than a dozen children at B. Bernice Young Elementary School singing a song praising President Barack Obama, which Conservative groups cited as a means of indoctrinating students to support the President. At the conclusion of the song, the children pump their fists and chant "hip, hip, hooray!" The song had been performed in conjunction with Black History Month activities and when the author of the book I Am Barack Obama visited the school the next month[83] Students from Burlington Township, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[84] Transportation Roads and highways As of May 2010, the township had a total of 100.69 miles (162.04 km) of roadways, of which 78.65 miles (126.57 km) were maintained by the municipality, 15.03 miles (24.19 km) by Burlington County and 5.36 miles (8.63 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 1.65 miles (2.66 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[85] The New Jersey Turnpike (including the Pennsylvania Extension and the turnpike bridge) passes through the township for 0.8 miles (1.3 km) from the river to Florence Township.[86] While there is no turnpike interchange within the township's borders, it is accessible in neighboring Florence Township (at Exit 6A on the Pennsylvania Extension) and Westampton Township (at Interchange 5, which is signed for Burlington-Mount Holly).[87] Other roads that pass through Burlington Township include U.S. Route 130, Interstate 295 and County Road 541. Public transportation New Jersey Transit provides bus service in the city between Trenton and Philadelphia on the 409 route and between Burlington and Camden on the 413 and 419 routes.[88][89] The New Jersey Transit River Line light rail system provides transportation between the Trenton Transit Center in Trenton and the Walter Rand Transportation Center (and other stations) in Camden, with stops in Burlington City at Burlington South[90] and Burlington Towne Centre,[91] but not in Burlington Township itself.[92] Notable people See also: Category:People from Burlington Township, New Jersey. People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Burlington Township include: Kevin Baggett, head coach of the Rider University men's basketball team.[93] Musa Cooper (born 1978), dancer and fitness model who has had several television appearances, and is best known for being featured on the first two seasons of the television dance competition So You Think You Can Dance.[94] Thomas P. Foy (c. 1951–2004), member of the New Jersey General Assembly and New Jersey Senate whose start in politics was on the Burlington Township Council.[95] Rod Streater (born 1988), wide receiver for the Oakland Raiders.[96]
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