Thursday, 15 February 2018

Altered Carbon Recap: One Life to Live

1

It's time for a heist! That's essentially the climax of the penultimate episode of Netflix's Altered Carbon, which features Takashi Kovacs and his buddies breaking into Head in the Clouds, the "satellite of sin" at which Reileen Kawahara is holding Kristin Ortega. In an action-packed episode we get double the Joel Kinnaman, the truth behind the deaths of the girl who fell from the sky and the bajillionaire Laurens Bancroft, and some excellent action. We may even get glimpses of what this show could look like in future seasons. But, most of all, we set the stage for what promises to be an explosive climax.

Kovacs says he knows what happened to Bancroft. He may have figured it out, but Poe is annoyed that they framed someone last episode and doesn't really want to hear it. "I think your relationship with honesty is passing at best," he says. (The dialogue this episode is sharper than usual.) Kovacs is trying to get a hold of Ortega and his buddy Vernon — neither are picking up. And then Ortega walks in, bloodied and battered. She tells Kovacs she's been killing his sister … a bunch.

But something's not right about Ortega. What first feels like inconsistent writing is actually a twist. That's not Kristin Ortega. It's Rei, using Ortega's body to get secrets out of Kovacs and play with his mind a little further. She even shows off Ortega's naked body — which could be considered a bit kinky given that's really Kovacs's sister in that body. She tells her brother that she's going to destroy everything he cares about. "Blood was taken from me," she says. "Blood is owed."

Rei is going to take that blood payment from everyone related to Kristin Ortega. We see the Ghost Walker go to their house, killing everyone, including Ortega's mother and children who live in the home. Kovacs gets there too late to save everyone. It's brutal, and shows you how far Rei is willing to go when she feels wronged. She's a true villain.

Said villain is back in her sleeve in an excellent scene between Kinnaman and Lachman, both of whom have been really good the last few episodes. Kovacs has a surprise for his sister — he has the stack from Mary Lou, the girl who fell from the sky. She's the missing piece in this entire puzzle of what happened to Bancroft and why Ryker was framed. Rei is surprised that Kovacs has her stack. It's clear now that Rei found a way to experiment on prostitutes, changing their religious coding in a way that would basically allow people to get away with murder like they haven't since re-sleeving was invented. We learn more about Rei's motivations — she was stolen from her brother and became obsessed with getting him back. He leaves the conversation and gets in a car with Miriam, and we see that they're being watched … by Kovacs!

It's time for double the Kinnaman! First, we flash back 18 hours earlier to a conversation between the Elliots about Lizzie's progression. Earlier in the episode, we saw that Poe may have fed Lizzie's dark side a little too much, turning her into a killing machine. This is an interesting development in that it feels like people who were betrayed like Rei and Lizzie were then made too powerful by this modern society and never taught enough empathy and kindness. Anyone else think Lizzie could be a major season two character? Maybe even a villain?

The bulk of "Rage in Heaven" consists of Kovacs's plan to free Ortega and coerce a confession out of his sister. At first, he thinks he can do it alone, but he'll give in and utilize Ava, Vernon, Poe, and even Mickey to help with the plan. It involves a double sleeve — two Kovacs at once. They even try to play rock-paper-scissors to see who stays behind and who goes to Head in the Clouds, but apparently you can't play that kind of game with your clone. They always throw the same thing.

The key to the assault on the Clouds is in stopping Rei's backup, essentially taking away her immortality. It involves Vernon masquerading as a general visiting the house of sin. He goes into a room where he meets a sex worker who's basically offering herself up for anything. Someone refers to the workers there as "snuff whores." Gross. Vernon is kind to her, giving her a drink and making her lie down. He claims he's gonna shut down all of this hellhole. He goes to the access panel across the corridor, getting instructions from Ava, while Kovacs is forced to subdue some guards. The line of the week may be Ava's about Kovacs: "He's a suicidal idiot who never gives up."

Vernon is offered another woman/man/child to do with whatever he pleases and Vernon's had enough. He kills a few people who probably deserve killin' and goes to help Kovacs, who has lowered his body temperature to avoid being caught by poisoning himself. The pair get into the room with Rei just as she's about to back herself up. They fry it the second before it hits 100 percent. Rei is annoyed. Kovacs sees Ortega but can't pull her out of VR torture yet or risk setting off alarms. Rei does get a truly malevolent line in "I'm gonna watch Ortega eat her own fucking eyeballs." Kovacs breaks it to her: She didn't back up. This is her only life and she's wearing it.

"Start with the night Bancroft got torched," Takeshi Kovacs says. And we get a confessional. Reileen needed an angry Bancroft to go one step further. She wanted to blackmail him into stopping the 653, the group protesting re-sleeving. They were getting in the way of Rei's re-coding plans. So, she drugged Bancroft with something called Stallion through a kiss from Miriam, who owed Rei. Bancroft went to his house of sin in the clouds and the drug pushed him overboard. He "real-deathed" the first girl, and then Mary Lou panicked, hurling herself from the sky. She assumed her stack would be found and she would be spun up and everything would be fine, but she didn't know Rei controlled the police in Bay City.

So, what happened to Laurens Bancroft? He really did kill himself. He wanted to forget the horror of what he had done to the girl at Head in the Clouds and to derail 653. "His arrogance wouldn't let him believe he killed himself," Rei says. It's interesting that we wouldn't be here without that arrogance. Suddenly, Vernon is attacked. Guards come in. Kovacs forgot the number-one lesson of action movies: Never let the villain monologue for too long!

• Ato Essandoh, who plays Vernon, has his best episode this chapter. He would make an interesting lead in an action show.

• Some of the noir movie titles stolen for Altered Carbon have had similar plots to this show, but this one feels cribbed because of how it literally reflects the action in the skies: Rage in Heaven is a 1941 film starring Robert Montgomery and Ingrid Bergman, for the record.

• When Kovacs discovers Ortega's murdered family, there's a great cover of a classic folk song alternately known as "God's Gonna Cut You Down" and "Run On." This version is by Black Rebel Motorcycle Club.

• Only two sci-fi recommendations left so I'm going to use them for two of my favorites. Go watch Steven Spielberg's A.I.: Artificial Intelligence, another examination of identity and family. It's a masterpiece.

*Washington Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 687[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 66 (+10.6%) from the 621 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 184 (-22.9%) from the 805 counted in the 1990 Census.[18] Washington was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on November 19, 1802, from portions of Evesham Township, Little Egg Harbor Township and Northampton Township (now known as Mount Holly Township, New Jersey). Portions of the township were taken to form Shamong Township (February 19, 1852), Bass River Township (March 30, 1864), Woodland Township (March 7, 1866) and Randolph Township (March 17, 1870, reannexed to Washington Township on March 28, 1893).[19][20] The township was named for George Washington, one of more than ten communities statewide named for the first president.[21][22] It is one of five municipalities in the state of New Jersey with the name "Washington Township".[23] Another municipality, Washington Borough, is completely surrounded by Washington Township, Warren County. Contents 1 Geography 2 Demographics 2.1 Census 2010 2.2 Census 2000 3 Government 3.1 Local government 3.2 Federal, state and county representation 3.3 Politics 4 Education 5 Transportation 6 References 7 External links Geography According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 102.706 square miles (266.006 km2), including 99.522 square miles (257.761 km2) of land and 3.184 square miles (8.245 km2) of water (3.10%).[1][2] The township borders Bass River Township, Shamong Township, Tabernacle Township and Woodland Township in Burlington County; and Egg Harbor City, Hammonton and Port Republic in Atlantic County.[24] Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Batsto, Bear Swamp Hill, Bridgeport, Bulltown, Crowleytown, Friendship Bogs, Green Bank, Hermon, Hog Islands, Jemima Mount, Jenkins, Jenkins Neck, Lower Bank, Mount, Penn Place, Pleasant Mills, Quaker Bridge, Tylertown and Washington.[25] The township is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve.[26] All of the township is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Burlington County, along with areas in Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.[27] Demographics Historical population Census Pop. %± 1810 1,273 — 1820 1,225 -3.8% 1830 1,315 7.3% 1840 1,630 24.0% 1850 2,010 23.3% 1860 1,723 * -14.3% 1870 609 * -64.7% 1880 389 * -36.1% 1890 310 -20.3% 1900 617 99.0% 1910 597 -3.2% 1920 500 -16.2% 1930 478 -4.4% 1940 518 8.4% 1950 566 9.3% 1960 541 -4.4% 1970 673 24.4% 1980 808 20.1% 1990 805 -0.4% 2000 621 -22.9% 2010 687 10.6% Est. 2014 673 [11][28] -2.0% Population sources:1810-2000[29] 1810-1920[30] 1840[31] 1850-1870[32] 1850[33] 1870[34] 1880-1890[35] 1890-1910[36] 1910-1930[37] 1930-1990[38] 2000[39][40] 2010[8][9][10] * = Lost territory in previous decade.[19] Census 2010 At the 2010 United States Census, there were 687 people, 256 households, and 177.9 families residing in the township. The population density was 6.9 per square mile (2.7/km2). There were 284 housing units at an average density of 2.9 per square mile (1.1/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 93.89% (645) White, 1.89% (13) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 0.15% (1) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 3.64% (25) from other races, and 0.44% (3) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 9.02% (62) of the population.[8] There were 256 households, of which 25.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.5% were married couples living together, 7.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.16.[8] In the township, 18.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 11.5% from 18 to 24, 21.7% from 25 to 44, 33.5% from 45 to 64, and 15.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.9 years. For every 100 females there were 106.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.5 males.[8] The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $96,250 (with a margin of error of +/- $21,869) and the median family income was $108,239 (+/- $9,762). Males had a median income of $19,946 (+/- $15,879) versus $41,250 (+/- $4,961) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,808 (+/- $10,822). About 0.0% of families and 21.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[41] Census 2000 As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 621 people, 160 households, and 112 families residing in the township. The population density was 6.2 people per square mile (2.4/km²). There were 171 housing units at an average density of 1.7 per square mile (0.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 83.57% White, 2.90% African American, 0.32% Asian, 12.08% from other races, and 1.13% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.07% of the population.[39][40] There were 160 households out of which 35.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.3% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.4% were non-families. 24.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.27.[39][40] In the township the population was spread out with 29.3% under the age of 18, 3.5% from 18 to 24, 23.8% from 25 to 44, 19.0% from 45 to 64, and 24.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 92.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.8 males.[39][40] The median income for a household in the township was $41,250, and the median income for a family was $42,188. Males had a median income of $32,000 versus $31,719 for females. The per capita income for the township was $13,977. About 8.0% of families and 16.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.4% of those under age 18 and 13.9% of those age 65 or over.[39][40] Government Local government Washington Township is governed under the Township form of government. The governing body is a three-member Township Committee, whose members are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6][42] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor. As of 2015, the members of the Washington Township Council are Mayor Dudley Lewis (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2016; term as mayor ends 2015), Barry F. Cavileer (R, 2015) and Daniel L. James (R, 2017).[3][43][44][45][46] Federal, state and county representation Washington Township is located in the 2nd Congressional District[47] and is part of New Jersey's 9th state legislative district.[9][48][49] New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[50] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[51] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[52][53] For the 2014-15 Session, the 9th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher J. Connors (R, Lacey Township) and in the General Assembly by DiAnne Gove (R, Long Beach Township) and Brian E. Rumpf (R, Little Egg Harbor Township).[54] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[55] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[56] Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[57] The board chooses a director and deputy director from among its members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[57] As of 2015, Burlington County's Freeholders are Director Mary Ann O'Brien (R, Medford Township, 2017; Director of Administration and Human Services),[58] Deputy Director Bruce Garganio (R, Florence Township, 2017; Director of Public Works and Health),[59] Aimee Belgard (D, Edgewater Park Township, 2015; Director of Hospital, Medical Services and Education)[60] Joseph Donnelly (R, Cinnaminson Township, 2016; Director of Public Safety, Natural Resources, and Education)[61] and Joanne Schwartz (D, Southampton Township, 2015; Director of Health and Corrections).[62][57] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Tim Tyler,[63] Sheriff Jean E. Stanfield[64] and Surrogate George T. Kotch.[65] Politics As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 536 registered voters in Washington Township, of which 85 (15.9% vs. 33.3% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 271 (50.6% vs. 23.9%) were registered as Republicans and 180 (33.6% vs. 42.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[66] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 78.0% (vs. 61.7% in Burlington County) were registered to vote, including 95.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.3% countywide).[66][67] In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 221 votes (59.2% vs. 40.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 142 votes (38.1% vs. 58.1%) and other candidates with 7 votes (1.9% vs. 1.0%), among the 373 ballots cast by the township's 533 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.0% (vs. 74.5% in Burlington County).[68][69] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 250 votes (57.9% vs. 39.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 168 votes (38.9% vs. 58.4%) and other candidates with 11 votes (2.5% vs. 1.0%), among the 432 ballots cast by the township's 545 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.3% (vs. 80.0% in Burlington County).[70] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 272 votes (62.1% vs. 46.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 160 votes (36.5% vs. 52.9%) and other candidates with 4 votes (0.9% vs. 0.8%), among the 438 ballots cast by the township's 558 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.5% (vs. 78.8% in the whole county).[71] In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 156 votes (66.4% vs. 61.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 61 votes (26.0% vs. 35.8%) and other candidates with 10 votes (4.3% vs. 1.2%), among the 235 ballots cast by the township's 509 registered voters, yielding a 46.2% turnout (vs. 44.5% in the county).[72][73] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 186 votes (62.4% vs. 47.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 91 votes (30.5% vs. 44.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 17 votes (5.7% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 2 votes (0.7% vs. 1.2%), among the 298 ballots cast by the township's 552 registered voters, yielding a 54.0% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[74] Education The Washington Township School District serves students in public school for pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade at Green Bank Elementary School. As of the 2012-13 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 37 students and 4.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 7.81:1.[75] The school's $5.4 million building opened in September 2006.[76] Since the 2007-08 school year, as part of an agreement with the Mullica Township Schools, Washington Township receives teaching support from the Mullica district and shares its superintendent, business administrator and other support staff. Washington Township students in grades five through eight attend Mullica Township Middle School as part of a program that has expanded since it was initiated in the 2007-08 school year.[77][78][79][80] Students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Cedar Creek High School, which is located in the northern section of Egg Harbor City and opened to students in September 2010.[81] The school is one of three high schools operated as part of the Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District, which also includes the constituent municipalities of Egg Harbor City, Galloway Township, Hamilton Township, and Mullica Township, and participates in sending/receiving relationships with Port Republic and Washington Township.[82][83] Cedar Creek High School is zoned to serve students from Egg Harbor City, Mullica Township, Port Republic and Washington Township, while students in portions of Galloway and Hamilton townships have the can attend Cedar Creek as an option or to participate in magnet programs at the school.[84][85] Prior to the opening of Cedar Creek, students from Washington Township had attended Oakcrest High School, together with students from Hamilton Township, Mullica Township and Port Republic.[86] Students from Washington Township, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[87] Transportation As of May 2010, the township had a total of 54.31 miles (87.40 km) of roadways, of which 29.32 miles (47.19 km) were maintained by the municipality and 24.99 miles (40.22 km) by Burlington County.[88] The only major roads that pass through are County Road 542 and County Road 563. Limited access roads are accessible in neighboring communities, including the Atlantic City Expressway in Hammonton and the Garden State Parkway in Galloway Township, Port Republic and Bass River Township.
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